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Compatibility and Use

IndyJunior has been tested and is known to work on the following platforms with flash player 6.0 or greater:

If there's one thing...

That you're going to read on this page, please read the instructions for creating your locations.xml file.

Installing IndyJunior

Since IndyJunior is a Flash app that you will be including on your site we're going to discuss installation in terms of putting the files on your web server and where they should be. The indyjunior.swf file can go wherever you please as long as you point the embed tag in the right place. The place where locations.xml lives is also very important but this can be specified in the embed tag. When you fire up the configuration page you will see a form field asking you the URL of the XML file. This should be a full url (http://www.site.com/what/ever/directory/locations.xml).

Configuring IndyJunior

There are a lot of options built into IndyJunior. Because it would take a long time to explain everything and we want this to be as easy as possible, the IndyJunior download comes with a configuration page. The configuration page will help you change colors, point marker styles, and all the other aspects of IndyJunior. Once you finally get the right look all you have to do it hit the "Get the code!" button and copy/paste the code into your HTML. If you're really in the mood to tinker we suggest looking at the output from the configuration page and playing with those values.

Creating locations.xml

Every time someone views the map a data file is loaded that includes your travel information. This is called locations.xml and is a structured XML document. The bare minimum that is required for each point to plot is a latitude/longitude pair specified in decimal degrees, arrival date, and name of the location. If you need to convert your coordinates from degrees-minutes-seconds to decimal degrees please use this tool.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<travels>
<location arrival="2003-04-19">
  <name>Palo Alto, CA</name>
  <latitude>37.4419N</latitude>
  <longitude>122.1419W</longitude>
</location>
</travels>

As you can see, all of the locations in our document are contained within a <travels> tag. The arrival attribute of the <location> tag is very important. This tells IndyJunior when you will be in that location so it can judge whether to use the past, current, or future point marker styles. The other tags are probably self explanatory, so let's move on to some optional information.

If you would like, each <location> tag can also contain a <note> and a <url>.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<travels>
<location arrival="2003-04-19">
  <name>Palo Alto, CA</name>
  <latitude>37.4419N</latitude>
  <longitude>122.1419W</longitude>
  <note>Hello world!</note>
  <url>http://www.bryanboyer.com</url>
</location>
</travels>

In the example above, when a user mouses over the point marker for Palo Alto, CA the will see the text "Hello World!" in addition to the standard information like name and arrival date. In addition, if the user clicks on the point marker for Palo Alto, CA they will be taken to the url specified: http://www.bryanboyer.com.

There is no limit to the number of locations that you can keep in the IndyJunior locations.xml file. The only thing to keep in mind is that this file is downloaded by the user each time, so you probably don't want to include you're life's travels. There is also currently no way to ignore old data, so you may have to adjust the XML file to suit your needs.

Where do I get the coordinates?

The easiest way to find a given location's latitude and longitude is to use one of these sites (list adopted from geourl.org:

Also available on the download page is airports.xml. This file includes a good number of the world's larger airports listed with name, airport code (e.g. LAX), and latitude/longitude coordinates. This file has been adopted and scrubbed from elsewhere on the internet, so we make no claims about the reliability.

© 2003-2010 bryanboyer.